Tag Archive | "Mary Bono Mack"

Tech at Night: SECURE IT comes to the House, Aereo gets sued for innovating, FCC needs reform


Tech at Night

Great news! Tech at Night’s favorite Representative Marsha Blackburn, along with TaN’s own home representative Mary Bono Mack are bringing a version of Secure IT to the House. The bill has been introduced in the Senate as an alternative to the power grab known as Lieberman-Collins. The great thing about the bill? It toughens criminal penalties for online lawbreaking even as it makes it easier for the private sector to share information about attacks.

The bad guys share information, and they think they won’t go to jail. If we let the good guys share information without getting sued for it, and if we throw the bad guys in jail, we win. And you can tell that the bad guys really hate it when we send them to jail; just witness how Anonymous has been hitting law enforcement more and more in the last year or so, most recently targeting Interpol’s website, and previously publishing names and addresses of police officers in the US. These online terrorists don’t like that they can be held accountable for their actions. It’s their weakness, the fact that they are named individuals who are finite in numbers, and we need to exploit it.

I know we had to push hard against some good members of Congress in order to send a message on SOPA, but it had to be done. The RIAA is not giving up on SOPA, so it was important that we let good members of Congress know what the problem was. And we did, so now it’s time to move on to passing good bills like SECURE IT.

Yes, the FCC does need reform. Republicans want a transparent and accountable FCC, so naturally Obama Democrats are opposed. The Obama FCC and allies is out of control: shifting opinions of market forces as is convenient to justify power grabs, taking power in new issues needlessly, buddying up with George Soros-funded radicals at Free Press, and of course blocking spectrum transactions needed to service the growing market for wireless Internet. The FCC is out of control. Obama regulators know no bounds.

Someone came up with a clever idea recently: lease television antennas to people so they can watch free broadcast television over those channels. The clever part? Aereo would let you watch over the Internet what your antenna picks up. Naturally, this threatens some cable television revenues, if people actually have free stuff, so the broadcasters are suing. I hope they lose. These are purely free, over the air broadcasts.

PATENT WARS: Apple and Samsung lose some claims against each other in Germany, essentially drawing without injury. Google/Motorola Mobility however is at risk of some pretty bad worst-case scenarios over its loss to Apple in Germany.

Phone app development is creating jobs and wealth! Quick, to the Schumer-mobile! That job creation must be stopped, post haste!

Posted in News, Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: SECURE IT comes to the House, Aereo gets sued for innovating, FCC needs reform


Tech at Night

Great news! Tech at Night’s favorite Representative Marsha Blackburn, along with TaN’s own home representative Mary Bono Mack are bringing a version of Secure IT to the House. The bill has been introduced in the Senate as an alternative to the power grab known as Lieberman-Collins. The great thing about the bill? It toughens criminal penalties for online lawbreaking even as it makes it easier for the private sector to share information about attacks.

The bad guys share information, and they think they won’t go to jail. If we let the good guys share information without getting sued for it, and if we throw the bad guys in jail, we win. And you can tell that the bad guys really hate it when we send them to jail; just witness how Anonymous has been hitting law enforcement more and more in the last year or so, most recently targeting Interpol’s website, and previously publishing names and addresses of police officers in the US. These online terrorists don’t like that they can be held accountable for their actions. It’s their weakness, the fact that they are named individuals who are finite in numbers, and we need to exploit it.

I know we had to push hard against some good members of Congress in order to send a message on SOPA, but it had to be done. The RIAA is not giving up on SOPA, so it was important that we let good members of Congress know what the problem was. And we did, so now it’s time to move on to passing good bills like SECURE IT.

Yes, the FCC does need reform. Republicans want a transparent and accountable FCC, so naturally Obama Democrats are opposed. The Obama FCC and allies is out of control: shifting opinions of market forces as is convenient to justify power grabs, taking power in new issues needlessly, buddying up with George Soros-funded radicals at Free Press, and of course blocking spectrum transactions needed to service the growing market for wireless Internet. The FCC is out of control. Obama regulators know no bounds.

Someone came up with a clever idea recently: lease television antennas to people so they can watch free broadcast television over those channels. The clever part? Aereo would let you watch over the Internet what your antenna picks up. Naturally, this threatens some cable television revenues, if people actually have free stuff, so the broadcasters are suing. I hope they lose. These are purely free, over the air broadcasts.

PATENT WARS: Apple and Samsung lose some claims against each other in Germany, essentially drawing without injury. Google/Motorola Mobility however is at risk of some pretty bad worst-case scenarios over its loss to Apple in Germany.

Phone app development is creating jobs and wealth! Quick, to the Schumer-mobile! That job creation must be stopped, post haste!

Posted in News, Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: Cybersecurity battle sends McCain to find Republican help, LightSquared fights, Obama regulators are dangerous!


Tech at Night

The big stories this week continue to be LightSquared and cybersecurity. Even as House Democrats complain about government doing too much, incredibly, we see that Senate Democrats are so inflexible that John McCain is in a gang of Republicans to fight the Democrats on the cybersecurity bill. Consider that. That’s how extreme Harry Reid, Joe Lieberman, Jay Rockefeller, and Susan Collins are on this. John McCain is putting together a team to make a Republican bill with Kay Bailey Hutchison and others, rather than sign on with a Democrat on a bill. Danger, Will Robinson! Harry Reid is that much of an extremist!

Reid is rushing to pass it, but details come out anyway, such as an attack on FOIA. Transparency! Not.

Speaking of transparency, the firm that the Barack Obama FCC has remained oddly silent on, and that insists the FCC should remain silent on, is ready to go on the offensive. It almost seems like LightSquared bet the company on this, and will go down swinging. They may end up making a spectrum trade though, which if workable would be interesting.

There is good news, though. The tax deal has essentially forced the President to go along with some FCC spectrum reform. With current technology, spectrum is a finite resource that we must manage for the greater good. That means getting into the hands of the people who can use it the best, and we can decide that with market forces. Spectrum auctions create jobs though, as we’ve seen with LightSquared, Some spectrum needs to be held aside for national security, civil defense, and first responders.

PATENT WARS. Well, Patent and Trademark wars. China steals iPads in its fascist bias against the foreign Apple claim. Turns out though that Amazon’s recent actions in China were not anti-Apple and were unrelated to the trademark battle.

Apple is on the winning side in another country, though. Apple is winning over Motorola Mobility (the firm being acquired by Google, so soon this will be a direct Apple-Google war) over Motorola’s apparent infringement of a slide-to-unlock patent. I believe Google will solve this by using another gesture for unlocking a phone.

Oh yes, and another Google/Apple thing to pas the popcorn on: Google tries to track you even when your iPhone tries to stop it. Google is almost certainly lying through its teeth when it claims that it’s not tracking anything at all. That’s what Google does, it’s their core product: the synthesis of information to sell targeted advertising. That’s why they made the huge stink about unifying your accounts across sites and unifying the privacy rules for them.

But this an industry matter. The inflated egos on Capitol Hill need to take Will Riker’s advice to the fake Jean-Luc Picard: “Shut up. Close your mouth and stop talking.” Nobody wants to hear them talking to hear themselves talk, and nobody needs any legislation.

Mary Bono Mack: You’re still my representative. I so badly wish you’d find something productive to do. We don’t need a privacy nanny. We really don’t. Government regulation is harder to avoid and more dangerous than anything Google is doing. Google is optional. You people aren’t.

The fact is people want to sell their privacy. It’s just not that valuable to them. Firms off the Internet have worked that angle for years. And guess what? When people can buy a little of your privacy, they can sell you stuff cheap, or even free. You have a choice. Use it, or not. Leave government out of it.

The Anontards keep hitting webpages. Anonymous is even a failure at life than the Occupations. These social outcasts, jerks and losers who tell themselves they have Asperger’s Syndrome so that they don’t risk killing themselves for being just total wastes of human flesh, they are unbathed, semi-literate, lazy fools who can’t have a conversation and barely even try. And they deface webpages! Inconveniencing innocent third parties, costing the taxpayers (including their parents, I’m sure) without actually accomplishing anything. Joy!

Again, Add the SEC to the list of runaway regulators being cheered by George Soros-funded front groups like Free Press. We have to beat Obama. I’m sorry, but you’re blind if you can’t see that there’s a striking, huge, wide gap between this radical socialist and any Republican. That’s right. Any Republican. Yes, including the one you don’t like. I don’t care. Read, study, and watch this. The EPA, the FCC, the FTC, the SEC, they’re all packed with radicals who believe themselves above the law. Next they’re coming after school lunches. Just watch. This administration is dangerously out of control.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: Cybersecurity battle sends McCain to find Republican help, LightSquared fights, Obama regulators are dangerous!


Tech at Night

The big stories this week continue to be LightSquared and cybersecurity. Even as House Democrats complain about government doing too much, incredibly, we see that Senate Democrats are so inflexible that John McCain is in a gang of Republicans to fight the Democrats on the cybersecurity bill. Consider that. That’s how extreme Harry Reid, Joe Lieberman, Jay Rockefeller, and Susan Collins are on this. John McCain is putting together a team to make a Republican bill with Kay Bailey Hutchison and others, rather than sign on with a Democrat on a bill. Danger, Will Robinson! Harry Reid is that much of an extremist!

Reid is rushing to pass it, but details come out anyway, such as an attack on FOIA. Transparency! Not.

Speaking of transparency, the firm that the Barack Obama FCC has remained oddly silent on, and that insists the FCC should remain silent on, is ready to go on the offensive. It almost seems like LightSquared bet the company on this, and will go down swinging. They may end up making a spectrum trade though, which if workable would be interesting.

There is good news, though. The tax deal has essentially forced the President to go along with some FCC spectrum reform. With current technology, spectrum is a finite resource that we must manage for the greater good. That means getting into the hands of the people who can use it the best, and we can decide that with market forces. Spectrum auctions create jobs though, as we’ve seen with LightSquared, Some spectrum needs to be held aside for national security, civil defense, and first responders.

PATENT WARS. Well, Patent and Trademark wars. China steals iPads in its fascist bias against the foreign Apple claim. Turns out though that Amazon’s recent actions in China were not anti-Apple and were unrelated to the trademark battle.

Apple is on the winning side in another country, though. Apple is winning over Motorola Mobility (the firm being acquired by Google, so soon this will be a direct Apple-Google war) over Motorola’s apparent infringement of a slide-to-unlock patent. I believe Google will solve this by using another gesture for unlocking a phone.

Oh yes, and another Google/Apple thing to pas the popcorn on: Google tries to track you even when your iPhone tries to stop it. Google is almost certainly lying through its teeth when it claims that it’s not tracking anything at all. That’s what Google does, it’s their core product: the synthesis of information to sell targeted advertising. That’s why they made the huge stink about unifying your accounts across sites and unifying the privacy rules for them.

But this an industry matter. The inflated egos on Capitol Hill need to take Will Riker’s advice to the fake Jean-Luc Picard: “Shut up. Close your mouth and stop talking.” Nobody wants to hear them talking to hear themselves talk, and nobody needs any legislation.

Mary Bono Mack: You’re still my representative. I so badly wish you’d find something productive to do. We don’t need a privacy nanny. We really don’t. Government regulation is harder to avoid and more dangerous than anything Google is doing. Google is optional. You people aren’t.

The fact is people want to sell their privacy. It’s just not that valuable to them. Firms off the Internet have worked that angle for years. And guess what? When people can buy a little of your privacy, they can sell you stuff cheap, or even free. You have a choice. Use it, or not. Leave government out of it.

The Anontards keep hitting webpages. Anonymous is even a failure at life than the Occupations. These social outcasts, jerks and losers who tell themselves they have Asperger’s Syndrome so that they don’t risk killing themselves for being just total wastes of human flesh, they are unbathed, semi-literate, lazy fools who can’t have a conversation and barely even try. And they deface webpages! Inconveniencing innocent third parties, costing the taxpayers (including their parents, I’m sure) without actually accomplishing anything. Joy!

Again, Add the SEC to the list of runaway regulators being cheered by George Soros-funded front groups like Free Press. We have to beat Obama. I’m sorry, but you’re blind if you can’t see that there’s a striking, huge, wide gap between this radical socialist and any Republican. That’s right. Any Republican. Yes, including the one you don’t like. I don’t care. Read, study, and watch this. The EPA, the FCC, the FTC, the SEC, they’re all packed with radicals who believe themselves above the law. Next they’re coming after school lunches. Just watch. This administration is dangerously out of control.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: The Return of the Revenge. Google Motorola deal approved. Spectrum. Skeptical of Telecommunications Act changes.


Tech at Night

Yup, I’m back. And I have roughly a week’s worth of stuff to cover, so let’s go.

Top story seems to be that The Obama/Holder Justice Department has no problem with Google’s vertical integration takeover of Motorola Mobility. Interesting. I also await word on whether Google will drop all aggressive patent lawsuits, as they claim to use patents only defensively.

Some people never learn. Google and Microsoft support the runaway FCC against Republican attempts to constrain the regulators to using clear, consistent, fair rules for spectrum policy. Sure, I understand that some such as Darrell Issa are unhappy about the unlicensed spectrum restrictions, but my view on this bill is mend it, don’t end it. What we do need to end is the ability of the FCC to micromanage industry by managing the FCC in a reasonable and responsible way. Greg Walden’s bill should pass in some form.

I’m just going to go ahead and do the rest of what I have queued up here as a series of quick links, because I’m behind and I don’t really have a coherent narrative in my head for any of it.

PATENT WARS: Apple sues Samsung again, this time over autocorrect. Adding insult to injury, Apple tablets outsell Samsung’s in Korea.

One study claims freely available movies online via BitTorrent sites don’t impact box office sales. Probably true, but highly misleading. More relevant would be whether BitTorrent-distributed movies impact DVD and BluRay sales.

Communist China continues its war on iPads even as it does nothing to protect American property. Communist and racist.

I don’t link to Media Freedom enough, and I don’t just say that because I had a role on the tech side of setting up the site. I do agree with the content quite a bit. Mike Wendy’s hammering a point I tried to hit hard, that we do more heavy lifting on Internet freedom than the left has, no matter what the embattled Andrew McLaughlin, who left the White House under a cloud of ethics scandal, has to say about it.

A Google/Verizon story this week reminds me of the Isaac Asimov story “The Dead Past.” Verizon was the big, evil, no-good meany for blocking Google Wallet. Then oops: Wallet was as insecure as Verizon said. Google says it’s fixed now, but score one for Verizon, it seems.

Look, I know that sometimes good tech policy crosses partisan lines, but re-think this push toward a privacy power grab, Mary Bono Mack. Please! The best cure for privacy ills is common sense combined with a smaller government.

The reason the FCC’s Net Neutrality orders are illegal is that the Telecommunications Act, a joint effort of the Gingrich Congress and the Clinton White House to protect the Internet from harmful regulations. The result was prosperity. So I look very skeptically at the recent push from more than one place to scrap and replace the bill.

In 1996 the Democrats joined the Republicans in wanting a light touch of government online, but that moment has passed. The Media Marxists, many George Soros-funded, want a government takeover online. It’s part of the “Media Reform” movement, and they have many Democrats in their pockets. Any tampering with the Telecommunications Act would risk key safeguards in place. Be careful!

Because we don’t want to do what authoritarian governments want, which is global Internet censorship through the UN.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: The Return of the Revenge. Google Motorola deal approved. Spectrum. Skeptical of Telecommunications Act changes.


Tech at Night

Yup, I’m back. And I have roughly a week’s worth of stuff to cover, so let’s go.

Top story seems to be that The Obama/Holder Justice Department has no problem with Google’s vertical integration takeover of Motorola Mobility. Interesting. I also await word on whether Google will drop all aggressive patent lawsuits, as they claim to use patents only defensively.

Some people never learn. Google and Microsoft support the runaway FCC against Republican attempts to constrain the regulators to using clear, consistent, fair rules for spectrum policy. Sure, I understand that some such as Darrell Issa are unhappy about the unlicensed spectrum restrictions, but my view on this bill is mend it, don’t end it. What we do need to end is the ability of the FCC to micromanage industry by managing the FCC in a reasonable and responsible way. Greg Walden’s bill should pass in some form.

I’m just going to go ahead and do the rest of what I have queued up here as a series of quick links, because I’m behind and I don’t really have a coherent narrative in my head for any of it.

PATENT WARS: Apple sues Samsung again, this time over autocorrect. Adding insult to injury, Apple tablets outsell Samsung’s in Korea.

One study claims freely available movies online via BitTorrent sites don’t impact box office sales. Probably true, but highly misleading. More relevant would be whether BitTorrent-distributed movies impact DVD and BluRay sales.

Communist China continues its war on iPads even as it does nothing to protect American property. Communist and racist.

I don’t link to Media Freedom enough, and I don’t just say that because I had a role on the tech side of setting up the site. I do agree with the content quite a bit. Mike Wendy’s hammering a point I tried to hit hard, that we do more heavy lifting on Internet freedom than the left has, no matter what the embattled Andrew McLaughlin, who left the White House under a cloud of ethics scandal, has to say about it.

A Google/Verizon story this week reminds me of the Isaac Asimov story “The Dead Past.” Verizon was the big, evil, no-good meany for blocking Google Wallet. Then oops: Wallet was as insecure as Verizon said. Google says it’s fixed now, but score one for Verizon, it seems.

Look, I know that sometimes good tech policy crosses partisan lines, but re-think this push toward a privacy power grab, Mary Bono Mack. Please! The best cure for privacy ills is common sense combined with a smaller government.

The reason the FCC’s Net Neutrality orders are illegal is that the Telecommunications Act, a joint effort of the Gingrich Congress and the Clinton White House to protect the Internet from harmful regulations. The result was prosperity. So I look very skeptically at the recent push from more than one place to scrap and replace the bill.

In 1996 the Democrats joined the Republicans in wanting a light touch of government online, but that moment has passed. The Media Marxists, many George Soros-funded, want a government takeover online. It’s part of the “Media Reform” movement, and they have many Democrats in their pockets. Any tampering with the Telecommunications Act would risk key safeguards in place. Be careful!

Because we don’t want to do what authoritarian governments want, which is global Internet censorship through the UN.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: Is ACTA a problem, and the return of Internet Kill Switch lite?


Tech at Night

There’s a lot of fear going around about ACTA, the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, a plurilateral agreement under the WTO between the US, the EU, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Japan, South Korea, and Morocco. Some of the fears look real, some don’t. For example, even though it was negotiated in secret, the text is easily available.

Another false complaint is that it’s another SOPA, when in fact such a claim misses the point. SOPA was a bad bill, as it turned out to be a censorship bill that defied due process, but the intent was to fight the problem of free riding on copyright and trademark. Crossing international boundaries has been a cheap and easy way to cash in on another country’s copyright and trademark laws without having to abide by them. SOPA tried to fix that in a crude, rude, and ineffective way. ACTA has more options, and doesn’t have to resort to censorship, necessarily.

I’ve just read the treaty. I don’t really see a problem. Even if infringement isn’t ruining the movies and music, trademark and copyright are Constitutional concepts worthy of protection. That’s why some of the anti-SOPA leaders are promoting their own bill.

The pro-liberty position is not one of anarchy. It’s time to get reasonable protections in place. Maybe I missed something, and ACTA is a problem. But the best argument I see against ACTA is that it only includes a few countries, and not those best known for infringement (such as China, either China in fact). ACTA may yet be harmless but ineffective, as opposed to SOPA being harmful and ineffective.

So no, don’t expect me to cry either that Megaupload’s data is dying. Businesses that profit from mass copyright infringement deserve to die. And besides, did people ever see that website? It was shady like crazy all along. Everyone knew this.

Now, on the other hand, what I do see and have seen a problem with are the various “cybersecurity” proposals we keep seeing. The worst of course was the infamous Internet Kill Switch, which actually was even more dangerous than it sounded: It proposed to give the President “emergency” dictatorial powers over broad ranges of private property related to the Internet.

A new bill has apparently eased up from that ridiculous degree, but there are still concerns that it gives too much of that power over certain companies, such as government contractors. Republicans Kay Bailey Hutchison, Chuck Grassley, and Saxby Chambliss along with Lisa Murkowski wrote in Politico that the current plan “is ultimately a costly and heavy-handed regulatory approach. It will not work and it won’t pass Congress.” If they’re right on the former, I hope they’re right on the latter. We don’t need to create yet more “broad new regulatory powers.”

I also maintain my opposition to the role of government in policing private sector ‘privacy violations.’ If you don’t like Google, use competitors or take sensible precautions like not staying logged in and using the same cookie across all their sites. There’s simply no place for Mary Bono Mack to act here. Also, as I analyzed in the past, Carrier IQ was a total nothingburger and it’s simply grandstanding for Edward Markey to push the issue, especially since the guy never did take a stand against SOPA. He’s trying to change the subject.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: Is ACTA a problem, and the return of Internet Kill Switch lite?


Tech at Night

There’s a lot of fear going around about ACTA, the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, a plurilateral agreement under the WTO between the US, the EU, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Japan, South Korea, and Morocco. Some of the fears look real, some don’t. For example, even though it was negotiated in secret, the text is easily available.

Another false complaint is that it’s another SOPA, when in fact such a claim misses the point. SOPA was a bad bill, as it turned out to be a censorship bill that defied due process, but the intent was to fight the problem of free riding on copyright and trademark. Crossing international boundaries has been a cheap and easy way to cash in on another country’s copyright and trademark laws without having to abide by them. SOPA tried to fix that in a crude, rude, and ineffective way. ACTA has more options, and doesn’t have to resort to censorship, necessarily.

I’ve just read the treaty. I don’t really see a problem. Even if infringement isn’t ruining the movies and music, trademark and copyright are Constitutional concepts worthy of protection. That’s why some of the anti-SOPA leaders are promoting their own bill.

The pro-liberty position is not one of anarchy. It’s time to get reasonable protections in place. Maybe I missed something, and ACTA is a problem. But the best argument I see against ACTA is that it only includes a few countries, and not those best known for infringement (such as China, either China in fact). ACTA may yet be harmless but ineffective, as opposed to SOPA being harmful and ineffective.

So no, don’t expect me to cry either that Megaupload’s data is dying. Businesses that profit from mass copyright infringement deserve to die. And besides, did people ever see that website? It was shady like crazy all along. Everyone knew this.

Now, on the other hand, what I do see and have seen a problem with are the various “cybersecurity” proposals we keep seeing. The worst of course was the infamous Internet Kill Switch, which actually was even more dangerous than it sounded: It proposed to give the President “emergency” dictatorial powers over broad ranges of private property related to the Internet.

A new bill has apparently eased up from that ridiculous degree, but there are still concerns that it gives too much of that power over certain companies, such as government contractors. Republicans Kay Bailey Hutchison, Chuck Grassley, and Saxby Chambliss along with Lisa Murkowski wrote in Politico that the current plan “is ultimately a costly and heavy-handed regulatory approach. It will not work and it won’t pass Congress.” If they’re right on the former, I hope they’re right on the latter. We don’t need to create yet more “broad new regulatory powers.”

I also maintain my opposition to the role of government in policing private sector ‘privacy violations.’ If you don’t like Google, use competitors or take sensible precautions like not staying logged in and using the same cookie across all their sites. There’s simply no place for Mary Bono Mack to act here. Also, as I analyzed in the past, Carrier IQ was a total nothingburger and it’s simply grandstanding for Edward Markey to push the issue, especially since the guy never did take a stand against SOPA. He’s trying to change the subject.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: It’s better for government to inform than to regulate, CWA dishes out talking points, Backlash against copyright freeloaders


Tech at Night

Mary Bono Mack, pay attention: Here’s the model for any privacy ventures you should attempt: voluntary action by private individuals, educated by simple government actions. If you really must get government involved, teach the people to fish, so that they can protect their own privacy for a lifetime.

Because if we insist on regulating the Internet problems of the moment, not only do we expand a government that’s already to big, we risk looking pretty stupid, too. Ah, Prodigy. I never did get their modem to work.

CWA, the union that stands to benefit from the AT&T/T-Mobile deal by gaining jobs in an economy that trends non-union, is talking down the chances of the deal completing. Which doesn’t surprise me, because I’ve noticed the George Soros-funded trolling here at RedState to be down lately; I think y’all are getting cocky. It’s not over yet, though.

Because make no mistake: CWA freely sings from the George Soros/Free Press/Public Knowledge songbook, spouting the tired old media reform talking points, for the transparent reason that CWA wants to prevent mergers that – in the short run – cost the union jobs. Because in the long run, people don’t create jobs in non-Right to Work states as much as they do in RtW states. It’s simple math that leads to the long-term death of the union. Competition.

Is Martin O’Malley claiming that there is no actual federal law against online Poker? If not, then why would he care whether the feds get involved? Nonetheless I agree, and I think we need deregulation, not new regulation. Repeal the UIGEA, and just let the market go.

Remember that plan the FCC has going, Universal Service Fund Reform, that’s going to turn the USF into a grab bag of subsidies? And how every remotely related industry is rushing in with a hand out? Unsurprisingly, the old/current recipients of this money are complaining that they’re going to lose their free money from the government. Boo hoo.

Even as the Occupy Wall Street movement demands free money for nothing themselves, some people are lashing out against the culture of entitlement that exists online, specifically the culture of free downloads of copyrighted works. It really is an obnoxious attitude you see, people who insist they deserve to get things free because they simply don’t want to pay. I’m adamantly opposed to expanding government just to smack these punks in the mouth, as satisfying as it would be, but I’m understanding of the frustration here.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: It’s better for government to inform than to regulate, CWA dishes out talking points, Backlash against copyright freeloaders


Tech at Night

Mary Bono Mack, pay attention: Here’s the model for any privacy ventures you should attempt: voluntary action by private individuals, educated by simple government actions. If you really must get government involved, teach the people to fish, so that they can protect their own privacy for a lifetime.

Because if we insist on regulating the Internet problems of the moment, not only do we expand a government that’s already to big, we risk looking pretty stupid, too. Ah, Prodigy. I never did get their modem to work.

CWA, the union that stands to benefit from the AT&T/T-Mobile deal by gaining jobs in an economy that trends non-union, is talking down the chances of the deal completing. Which doesn’t surprise me, because I’ve noticed the George Soros-funded trolling here at RedState to be down lately; I think y’all are getting cocky. It’s not over yet, though.

Because make no mistake: CWA freely sings from the George Soros/Free Press/Public Knowledge songbook, spouting the tired old media reform talking points, for the transparent reason that CWA wants to prevent mergers that – in the short run – cost the union jobs. Because in the long run, people don’t create jobs in non-Right to Work states as much as they do in RtW states. It’s simple math that leads to the long-term death of the union. Competition.

Is Martin O’Malley claiming that there is no actual federal law against online Poker? If not, then why would he care whether the feds get involved? Nonetheless I agree, and I think we need deregulation, not new regulation. Repeal the UIGEA, and just let the market go.

Remember that plan the FCC has going, Universal Service Fund Reform, that’s going to turn the USF into a grab bag of subsidies? And how every remotely related industry is rushing in with a hand out? Unsurprisingly, the old/current recipients of this money are complaining that they’re going to lose their free money from the government. Boo hoo.

Even as the Occupy Wall Street movement demands free money for nothing themselves, some people are lashing out against the culture of entitlement that exists online, specifically the culture of free downloads of copyrighted works. It really is an obnoxious attitude you see, people who insist they deserve to get things free because they simply don’t want to pay. I’m adamantly opposed to expanding government just to smack these punks in the mouth, as satisfying as it would be, but I’m understanding of the frustration here.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

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