Tag Archive | "AT&T"

AT&T/T-Mobile merger opponents silent in wake of T-Mobile USA layoffs


The $39 billion deal between AT&T and T-Mobile USA's parent company, Deutsche Telekom, died in December 2011 after heavy opposition

Posted in Daily Caller, Fox News, Politics, TechComments Off

AT&T rebukes FCC in wake of T-Mobile layoffs


'The FCC may consider itself an expert agency on telecom, but it is not omniscient'

Posted in Daily Caller, Fox News, News, Politics, TechComments Off

Tech at Night: Chuck Grassley holding firm on FCC oversight


Tech at Night

Apologies, but I’m going to be a bit brief tonight. I have a lot going on this week, and starting Tech at Night at midnight my time just isn’t good. Sorry!

Chuck Grassley’s continuing the fight against the runaway FCC, leaving open the option of continuing after initial investigations. Good on him. Don’t foreclose options needlessly.

But even as Republicans attempt to keep government from being a problem, the administration is trying to keep pesky job creation from popping up. Merger review has become a monster. So have the ever-multiplying facets of spectrum review.

The more the administration does, the more we need Congressional oversight.

Irony watch: FTC to protect helpless Microsoft from evil antitrust violations.

Irony watch II: Sprint may admit its CEO is the source of its failure to compete, since they can’t blame AT&T anymore.

Speaking of AT&T, remember that customer who sued in small claims court over the unlimited data changes, and won? The Death Star appears concerned and is trying to make a deal.

Posted in News, Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: Chuck Grassley holding firm on FCC oversight


Tech at Night

Apologies, but I’m going to be a bit brief tonight. I have a lot going on this week, and starting Tech at Night at midnight my time just isn’t good. Sorry!

Chuck Grassley’s continuing the fight against the runaway FCC, leaving open the option of continuing after initial investigations. Good on him. Don’t foreclose options needlessly.

But even as Republicans attempt to keep government from being a problem, the administration is trying to keep pesky job creation from popping up. Merger review has become a monster. So have the ever-multiplying facets of spectrum review.

The more the administration does, the more we need Congressional oversight.

Irony watch: FTC to protect helpless Microsoft from evil antitrust violations.

Irony watch II: Sprint may admit its CEO is the source of its failure to compete, since they can’t blame AT&T anymore.

Speaking of AT&T, remember that customer who sued in small claims court over the unlimited data changes, and won? The Death Star appears concerned and is trying to make a deal.

Posted in News, Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: Ron Johnson backing GOP’s SECURE IT Act, Anonymous fails again


Tech at Night

Harry Reid may be on a mad dash to bring the radical Liebmerman/Collins/Rockefeller cybersecurity bill, but a broad spectrum of Republicans continue to fight. Democrats may have toned down its Internet Kill Switch provisions, but still is a massive power grab online, and the new SECURE IT act is a much better idea.

What I absolutely love about SECURE it is that it hits all the key points: It strengthens criminal penalties for breaking into servers. It strengthens criminal penalties for breaking into servers (Yes, I said that twice on purpose because it’s that important). It creates private sector information sharing incentives without regulating the private sector at large. It turns inward and gets government to audit its own practices.

These are all the right ideas and none of the wrong ideas. Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin is speaking only the common-sense truth when he says “This bill recognizes that industry is at the center of any solution. It’s a sensible step forward that allows industry to invest in innovation and job creation rather than compliance. Imposing a costly and bureaucratic regulatory regime is the wrong approach to national security. New regulations will slow down innovation and investment while companies wait years for the government to introduce outdated standards. The regulatory process simply cannot keep up with the rapid pace of technology.”

It tells you just how basic and correct this bill is when it has co-sponsorship from such a broad spectrum of the caucus: Ron Johnson as mentioned, John McCain, Kay Bailey Hutchison, Chuck Grassley, Saxby Chambliss, Lisa Murkowski, Dan Coats, and Richard Burr.

Support Ron Johnson and the team. We want this bill passed. The common-sense alternative to the power grab cybersecurity bill.

Even extreme libertarians are cautious about the bill instead of strongly opposed, which I think we all can see is a big deal for a bill about strengthening national security. So it’s no wonder Harry Reid is promising to give the bill a fair chance. This could be the one that passes, especially if Greg Walden’s new House cybersecurity efforts make it clear that this is the one that can get through both chambers and to the President.

Criminal enforcement does matter. Why else would Anonymous online terrorists attack the Interpol webpage after an Interpol-led effort rolled up a 25-man Anonymous cell? When we arrest them and jail them, it hurts them. We need to do this more, and we need to make sure the penalties sting.

PATENT WARS: Well, again, this time it’s trademark wars. Apple is going after the EPAD in China after having won the iPad battle.

Why would we be in a rush to raise taxes on Facebook, an innovator and driver of job creation in this economy? Don’t believe me that they create jobs? Just look at Zynga and all the other companies around that exist because of Facebook and its popularity?

Should we have a whole FCC blackout regulation in place solely as a gift to major sports leagues that make billions of dollars? Probably not.

Kim Dotcom claims he’s as innocent as Saddam Hussein in defending his since-raided Megaupload operation. Look, the DMCA model of working with copyright holders is a reasonable one. If he wasn’t doing it, then he had it coming.

Thanks to George Soros, Public Knowledge, Gigi Sohn, and the rest of the anti-AT&T/T-Mobile team, AT&T is now having to stab we (as I’m one) unlimited data plan holders with throttling and caps. Lack of spectrum hurts, kids. And yet some of these people are going to complain that AT&T is doing what it has to after being the target of a team effort by Barack Obama and George Soros.

And they’re going to target AT&T’s next plan, too which is very simple one. AT&T would like to give wireless App developers he opportunity to subsidize data use by their apps, calling it the ’800 number model’ applied to mobile data. Some people are scared to death of this, because competition could force some data-heavy services to consider data costs when designing their apps. But it’s a great, innovative, market-based way to help people on metered data plans manage their use. Government shouldn’t interfere.

Some say we need a national sales tax compact to keep states from having to raise other taxes as the sales tax model breaks down. I’m not sure if it’s a bad thing to just have a smaller, simpler tax code, but it’s a fair point to consider. Some states may overreact, using the sales tax situation as cover for raising revenue.

Tech at Night continues to be on a shifted schedule this week thanks to my being detained last Friday and Monday.

Posted in News, Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: Ron Johnson backing GOP’s SECURE IT Act, Anonymous fails again


Tech at Night

Harry Reid may be on a mad dash to bring the radical Liebmerman/Collins/Rockefeller cybersecurity bill, but a broad spectrum of Republicans continue to fight. Democrats may have toned down its Internet Kill Switch provisions, but still is a massive power grab online, and the new SECURE IT act is a much better idea.

What I absolutely love about SECURE it is that it hits all the key points: It strengthens criminal penalties for breaking into servers. It strengthens criminal penalties for breaking into servers (Yes, I said that twice on purpose because it’s that important). It creates private sector information sharing incentives without regulating the private sector at large. It turns inward and gets government to audit its own practices.

These are all the right ideas and none of the wrong ideas. Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin is speaking only the common-sense truth when he says “This bill recognizes that industry is at the center of any solution. It’s a sensible step forward that allows industry to invest in innovation and job creation rather than compliance. Imposing a costly and bureaucratic regulatory regime is the wrong approach to national security. New regulations will slow down innovation and investment while companies wait years for the government to introduce outdated standards. The regulatory process simply cannot keep up with the rapid pace of technology.”

It tells you just how basic and correct this bill is when it has co-sponsorship from such a broad spectrum of the caucus: Ron Johnson as mentioned, John McCain, Kay Bailey Hutchison, Chuck Grassley, Saxby Chambliss, Lisa Murkowski, Dan Coats, and Richard Burr.

Support Ron Johnson and the team. We want this bill passed. The common-sense alternative to the power grab cybersecurity bill.

Even extreme libertarians are cautious about the bill instead of strongly opposed, which I think we all can see is a big deal for a bill about strengthening national security. So it’s no wonder Harry Reid is promising to give the bill a fair chance. This could be the one that passes, especially if Greg Walden’s new House cybersecurity efforts make it clear that this is the one that can get through both chambers and to the President.

Criminal enforcement does matter. Why else would Anonymous online terrorists attack the Interpol webpage after an Interpol-led effort rolled up a 25-man Anonymous cell? When we arrest them and jail them, it hurts them. We need to do this more, and we need to make sure the penalties sting.

PATENT WARS: Well, again, this time it’s trademark wars. Apple is going after the EPAD in China after having won the iPad battle.

Why would we be in a rush to raise taxes on Facebook, an innovator and driver of job creation in this economy? Don’t believe me that they create jobs? Just look at Zynga and all the other companies around that exist because of Facebook and its popularity?

Should we have a whole FCC blackout regulation in place solely as a gift to major sports leagues that make billions of dollars? Probably not.

Kim Dotcom claims he’s as innocent as Saddam Hussein in defending his since-raided Megaupload operation. Look, the DMCA model of working with copyright holders is a reasonable one. If he wasn’t doing it, then he had it coming.

Thanks to George Soros, Public Knowledge, Gigi Sohn, and the rest of the anti-AT&T/T-Mobile team, AT&T is now having to stab we (as I’m one) unlimited data plan holders with throttling and caps. Lack of spectrum hurts, kids. And yet some of these people are going to complain that AT&T is doing what it has to after being the target of a team effort by Barack Obama and George Soros.

And they’re going to target AT&T’s next plan, too which is very simple one. AT&T would like to give wireless App developers he opportunity to subsidize data use by their apps, calling it the ’800 number model’ applied to mobile data. Some people are scared to death of this, because competition could force some data-heavy services to consider data costs when designing their apps. But it’s a great, innovative, market-based way to help people on metered data plans manage their use. Government shouldn’t interfere.

Some say we need a national sales tax compact to keep states from having to raise other taxes as the sales tax model breaks down. I’m not sure if it’s a bad thing to just have a smaller, simpler tax code, but it’s a fair point to consider. Some states may overreact, using the sales tax situation as cover for raising revenue.

Tech at Night continues to be on a shifted schedule this week thanks to my being detained last Friday and Monday.

Posted in News, Politics, RedStateComments Off

Facebook Teams Up With Mobile Carriers for Payments



Facebook has inked deals with some top wireless carriers to facilitate mobile payments, the company announced Monday.

The company’s new partners include AT&T, T-Mobile USA and Verizon, among others. Under the new deal, consumers will be able to pay for their Facebook Credits via carrier billing. Speaking at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Facebook chief technology officer Bret Taylor (pictured) said the payments experience on the web is “broken” and added, “Even with operator billing support most require a step called SMS device verification. That means if I’m in the middle of the game and want to pay 99 cents, I have to wait for an SMS to arrive,” according to Inside Facebook.

In a further annoyance, Taylor said that after the SMS arrives, the user has to verify that their device is connected to their Facebook account.

“Then I have to awkwardly memorize the code and resubmit the transactions,” he said. “If I manage to make it this far, then I can finally go back to playing the game.” Facebook reps could not be reached for further comment.

The announcement comes as Facebook is prepping for its $5 billion IPO and is said to be setting its sights on monetizing its mobile operations via advertising. It’s not clear what Facebook’s stake in mobile payments would be. According to reports, Facebook is promising the telecoms a greater share of revenues and influence that the current mobile titans — Apple and Google — offer.

Taylor also told The Telegraph that if Mark Zuckerberg created Facebook today it would be a mobile app, rather than a web-based entity.

Image courtesy of Flickr, Jolieodell

More About: att, Facebook, mobile payments, t-mobile usa, verizon

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Posted in Business, Mashable, NewsComments Off

Upset About AT&T Throttling Your Data? You May Be in for a Payday



At last there’s some recourse for consumers upset about AT&T‘s decision to throttle their data: small claims court.

A precedent at least has been set by a California judge who ruled in favor on Friday of a man who sued AT&T charging its practice of slowing down data violated the terms of its “unlimited data” plan.

The man, an unemployed truck driver named Matt Spaccarelli, received $850 in the small claims court suit in Simi Valley, Calif. To AT&T, which posted revenues of $31.5 billion in its most-recent quarter, that’s pocket change, but Spaccarelli may soon have imitators.

According to a report by the Associated Press, about 17 million of AT&T’s customers with unlimited data plan could be subject to throttling, as Spaccarelli was. Under the terms of the contract, such users can’t band together in a class action lawsuit against AT&T, but they can sue them individually in small claims courts.

AT&T reps could not be reached for comment on whether the company plans to appeal the decision.

Spaccarelli’s case argues that his phone is being throttled after using 1.5 GB to 2 GB of data after the billing cycle starts. However, AT&T offers 3 GB of data to subscribers for the same fee Spaccarelli is paying — $30 per month.

AT&T’s customer contract outlines that consumers who win an award in arbitration will get at least $10,000. That was the amount that Spaccarelli sued for, but the judge in the case, Russell Nadel, calculated AT&T’s charge for every extra gigabyte over 3 GB ($10) across Spaccarelli’s remaining 10 months in the contract.

The telecom giant began throttling data for its top 5% of users this month to manage data usage on the network. AT&T’s not alone. Verizon is also throttling its top 5% and Sprint is slowing data for its top 1% of data hogs.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, geoadventures

More About: att, lawsuit, sprint, throttling, verizon

For more Business coverage:


Posted in Business, Mashable, NewsComments Off

Tech at Night: FCC overreach. Yes, this is new.


Tech at Night

FCC overreach doesn’t seem like it should be a new topic, but it actually is. Consider that the FCC is threatening to get into cybersecurity which is interesting since the Congress is working on it. FCC wants to get into campaign finance regulation. And it’s unclear whether the FCC would enforce White House calls for new privacy regulations.

The runaway FCC to me is the biggest reason to fear UN regulation of the Internet. A treaty would give the Barack Obama FCC an excuse.

Meanwhile, FCC does nothing about the coming spectrum shortage, an issue it should be fixing. Instead, it’s threatening to go along with T-Mobile’s request and block Verizon’s proposed spectrum deal on the heels of blocking AT&T’s proposed spectrum-oriented deal with T-Mobile. Fortunately the pro-growth, pro-liberty Free State Foundation is asking the FCC to quit changing the rules.

LightSquared is hurting after being turned away after the FCC’s closed, secret process. To the tune of 45% layoffs. Ouch.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

Tech at Night: FCC overreach. Yes, this is new.


Tech at Night

FCC overreach doesn’t seem like it should be a new topic, but it actually is. Consider that the FCC is threatening to get into cybersecurity which is interesting since the Congress is working on it. FCC wants to get into campaign finance regulation. And it’s unclear whether the FCC would enforce White House calls for new privacy regulations.

The runaway FCC to me is the biggest reason to fear UN regulation of the Internet. A treaty would give the Barack Obama FCC an excuse.

Meanwhile, FCC does nothing about the coming spectrum shortage, an issue it should be fixing. Instead, it’s threatening to go along with T-Mobile’s request and block Verizon’s proposed spectrum deal on the heels of blocking AT&T’s proposed spectrum-oriented deal with T-Mobile. Fortunately the pro-growth, pro-liberty Free State Foundation is asking the FCC to quit changing the rules.

LightSquared is hurting after being turned away after the FCC’s closed, secret process. To the tune of 45% layoffs. Ouch.

Posted in Politics, RedStateComments Off

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